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F = Female Genital Mutilation. Teaching mothers to read and write has been proven to stop their daughters suffering FGM

...is for Female Genital Mutilation

Teaching mothers to read and write has been proven to stop their daughters suffering FGM. In parts of Africa, more than 80% of women who had suffered FGM were illiterate. Being unable to read and write fuels the ignorance that allows FGM to continue. Literacy can help break the cycle.

UNICEF (2005) / World Health Organisation (2005)

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How our partners have helped.

28 Too Many researches FGM and supports community organisations, schools, hospitals and faith groups to help end the practice. They run events, workshops and give presentations to raise awareness of FGM. Low levels of literacy can contribute to misunderstandings about FGM and the harm it causes. 28 Too Many work with local partners, like the Maasai Cricket Warriors to help with literacy education and fight FGM from within the community.

28 Too Many researches FGM and supports community organisations, schools, hospitals and faith groups to help end the practice. They run events, workshops and give presentations to raise awareness of FGM. Low levels of literacy can contribute to misunderstandings about FGM and the harm it causes. 28 Too Many work with local partners, like the Maasai Cricket Warriors to help with literacy education and fight FGM from within the community.

In February 2015, 28 Too Many joined with sports development charity Cricket Without Boundaries for a project in Laikipia, Kenya, to increase awareness of why FGM needs to stop. This was also the first time that 28 Too Many partnered with the Maasai Cricket Warriors (MCW), a cricket team whose popularity is swiftly growing throughout Kenya and the cricket world.

As well as educating young people, the project had the support of the Maasai elders, the Head of Police and the Laikipia County Commissioner who all committed to stamping out FGM, with the MCW as the local face of the campaign.

This partnership was made possible because of two brothers, Daniel and Benjamin, who were players in the MCW. They became aware of the harm caused by FGM, and knowing that once cut, the girl’s education would end, and she would often be immediately married off.

In order to spare their sister, Nancy, from that life, Daniel and Benjamin went to their parents, showing what they had learned. They went further and with their MCW teammates petitioned their community elders. This was an incredibly brave step for these brothers to take, as in Maasai culture; young people do not speak against their parents or elders.

But due to the courage of these young men,their sister was saved from undergoing FGM. She is now happy and working hard in high school, with dreams of becoming a doctor. Nancy is also becoming a role model to the younger girls in her community, inspiring them to continue their education.

Recognizing the power and platform they have through the MCW, Daniel and Benjamin are proud to be working with 28 Too Many and Cricket Without Boundaries on the first cricket based anti-FGM project.

It was such a success that word has spread to the surrounding villages, and now more cricket coaching/anti-FGM sessions have been planned for the near future.

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28 Too Many researches FGM and supports community organisations, schools, hospitals and faith groups to help end the practice.
Educating and empowering young people is at the heart of our work and I have seen how education can lead to great change. In Kenya I met two girls who learnt about FGM at a school health club and then persuaded their village to end the practice.
Dr Ann-Marie Wilson, Executive Director, 28 Too Many
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